Tag Archives: harvest

First batch 2018

Sweet joy-black raspberries growing wild beside our garage.

Cleaned and ready for a quick freeze until I have enough to make some raspberry jam or ice cream OR BOTH!

I spread them out on a baking sheet after they’ve been washed, dried with a paper towel and then spread them out. Pop them in the freezer!

They’re really nice this year and sooooo sweet!

We got a 12 ounce Cool Whip bowl full.

We should have another bowl full by the weekend and then another patch on the farm should start ripening!  I’m so excited that I have something to finally store for the winter of 2018.

Recipe Pages Updated

Fall is in the air and cooler weather keeps me in the kitchen making comfort food.

Fall is in the air and cooler weather keeps me in the kitchen making comfort food.

I’ve added a few more goodies to my Recipe Page if anyone is interested. Hope you will enjoy them as much as we do! They include Pumpkin Pie Squares, Steamed Asparagus, Grilled Chicken Salad, and Pumpkin Cookies.

The Garden is Empty (almost)

We’ve cleaned out the garden and everything has been stored, frozen or canned. Hubby did till up a few spots and planted some turnips as a winter crop. He loves them boiled and with almost every meal. I like them raw!!

End of harvest 2016

End of harvest 2016

We harvested several small pumpkins and four large ones.  The small will adorn the entrance to our house and the large ones I canned.  dscn8721

I washed them good on the outside, split them in half, scooped out the pulp and seed and then sliced them to make peeling easier.

 

Split in half to clean.

Split in half to clean.

Sliced w/rind makes for easier peeling.

Sliced w/rind makes for easier peeling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diced to cook

Diced to cook

I diced them up in 1-2 inch pieces and put them in an old canner.  I put one quart of water over them to cook on the stove on medium low heat.

 

 

 

 

They need to cook slowly to keep from sticking/scorching.  I don’t add any seasoning until they’re to be used for pies, cookies, or pumpkin bread.

 

dscn8723  Once they’re tender enough to stick with a fork, I drain off the water and run the pumpkin through my sieve.  It’s very important to get as much water out of the pumpkin as possible before mashing.  I usually let the pumpkin set in the sieve for about 15-20 minutes so the water on the pieces will drip out.  Dump this water out before pressing.

I love this sieve and it works great for all vegies and fruits.

I love this sieve and it works great for all vegies and fruits.

It's beautiful and ready to go in the jars.  I use pint and quart jars because of the different recipes.

It’s beautiful and ready to go in the jars. I use pint and quart jars because of the different recipes.  

Quickly add the pumpkin to the jars, clean the tops of the jars and add the lids & rings, and tighten.

Quickly add the pumpkin to the jars, clean the tops of the jars and add the lids & rings, and tighten.  I process them in the hot water bath for 20 minutes.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out of the four pumpkins, I canned six pints and three quarts.  I can’t wait to start baking with them.  My pumpkin recipes will be added to my Recipes From My House To Yours page tomorrow.

I hope you can enjoy your garden harvest as much as we are.  With Hurricane Matthew charging up the coast and a cold front moving in from the northwest I’ve used some of our harvest today to make a big pot of homemade soup!!!  It’s suppertime!

Canning day again!

Eddie and I spent an hour in the apple orchard yesterday after lunch picking apples from one tree.  They’re huge, sweet/tart, white fruit and beautiful.

We don't know what kind it is but they have a wonderful taste that is not too sweet but not too tart and they're crisp. Hey're bigger than my hand this year and we picked about two bushel.

We don’t know what kind it is but they have a wonderful taste that is not too sweet but not too tart and they’re crisp. They’re  bigger than my hand this year and we picked about two bushel.

Apple picking 09162015 (4)

The tree is fairly young and still loaded with apples. Unfortunately one main branch broke off due to the weight.

The tree is fairly young and still loaded with apples. Unfortunately one main branch broke off due to the weight.

Apple picking 09162015 (6)

We picked apples and chestnuts yesterday and the deer are really coming after the chestnuts.

We picked apples and chestnuts yesterday and the deer are really coming after the chestnuts.

Eddie and I peeled two buckets full this morning and I got 28 quarts of apples canned today.

One sack full and two five gallon buckets full.

One sack full and two five gallon buckets full.

Canning apples (1)

Peeled, washed and ready to pack in the jars.

Peeled, washed and ready to pack in the jars.

We'll bake them, use them for fried pies, make apple pies, and eat them straight out of the jar.

We’ll bake them, use them for fried pies, make apple pies, and eat them straight out of the jar.

I peel the apples and slice them. Then I wash them in ice water twice, pack in jars and them pour a light sugar water syrup up to the neck of the jar. I process them in a hot water bath for 20 minutes.

I peel the apples and slice them. Then I wash them in ice water twice, pack in jars and them pour a light sugar water syrup up to the neck of the jar. I process them in a hot water bath for 20 minutes.

All 28 quarts sealed. When they cool overnight, I'll take them to the cellar in the morning. Now I just have to figure out what to do with the rest of the bushel I have left.

All 28 quarts sealed. When they cool overnight, I’ll take them to the cellar in the morning. Now I just have to figure out what to do with the rest of the bushel I have left.

Aren't the chestnuts beautiful too!

Aren’t the chestnuts beautiful too!

Canning season 2015

I retired July 8th and the garden came in like a fast moving thunderstorm!  For that entire month I was either in the kitchen canning, on the porch preparing to can or in the hayfield with hubby moving hay to the haylots.  I want to share with you our season bounty in a photo roll.

14 quarts all sealed and ready for the cellar

14 quarts all sealed and ready for the cellar

A full bushel of yellow onions. All of the red (Spanish) onions rotted in the ground. Apparently they don't like all the rain.

A full bushel of yellow onions. All of the red (Spanish) onions rotted in the ground. Apparently they don’t like all the rain.

The last run of honey for the season.

The last run of honey for the season.

Green beans. They didn't produce like we would have liked. Hubby thinks he minimized the space in the gardens and everything was too close together and the sun couldn't do it's thing.

Green beans. They didn’t produce like we would have liked. Hubby thinks he minimized the space in the gardens and everything was too close together and the sun couldn’t do it’s thing.

Pickles, pickle relish, and more pickles.

Pickles, pickle relish, and more pickles.

Blackberry crop was excellent and I froze a lot of them.

Blackberry crop was excellent and I froze a lot of them.

Apple butter 072015

Apple butter on toast for breakfast. Peanut butter and apple butter sandwich for lunch!

Apple butter on toast for breakfast. Peanut butter and apple butter sandwich for lunch!

Fresh raspberries

Fresh raspberries

Cherries

Cherries

Striper fish, fileted and frozen. I think we froze about 10 packages.

Striper fish, fileted and frozen. I think we froze about 10 packages.

I froze about 15 bags of white corn.

I froze about 15 bags of white corn.

Yellow corn was froze.

Yellow corn was froze.

Delicata squash was harvested and I stored about 20 in the cellar.

Delicata squash was harvested and I stored about 20 in the cellar.

Yellow squash was sliced and vacumn packed with about 20 bags.

Yellow squash was sliced and vacumn packed with about 20 bags.

I froze 18 pints of applesauce made from transparent apples.

I froze 18 pints of applesauce made from transparent apples.

We dug our potatoes on Thursday and picked up 21  five gallon buckets full and they’re beautiful again this year.  The potato bin is more than half full and it’s a 6’x6’x6′ bin.  We picked up about two gallon that were cut when plowed up and Friday I made a crockpot full of potato soup and a half gallon of potato salad.

The cellar is pretty well stocked but for two shelves which I saved for venison.  The Cellar 2015 (3)

This shelf section is full of green beans, canned potatoes and canned sausage.  The second photo is tomatoes, barbecue sauce, spaghetti sauce and more potatoes.  The third is full of jams, jellies, pickles, relish and maple syrup, and more.The Cellar 2015 (2) The Cellar 2015 (1)

We have three freezers of various sizes and one is full of fruit, one with vegetables and meat and the big freezer will be filled with meat as well. My family will be well fed this winter.

Hay harvest slow but moving along

I wanted to share some photos my daughter took last week while helping her Dad harvest some more hay!  I think they’re beautiful!

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Jippy decided to take a nap!!

Jippy decided to take a nap!!

Everyone was enjoying the day on the farm!

Everyone was enjoying the day on the farm!

 

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It was such a beautiful day to be on the farm!

The year is almost three quarters gone and what did I do?

                                                                                                                                                                    January -Ice and snow

February-Making maple syrup

January-February – grafting fruit trees

February – March – Seedlings started

March – Baby calves arrive

March-April – Spring turkey hunting for two of my favorite people.

April – fire wood for winter 2012

April – New equipment for working the cattle

April – More new fencing

May – Gardening begins

May – Honeybees cleaning house and we prepare for fresh honey

May – Bee swarming begins

May – Fruit trees bloom and we worry about late frosts.

June 2012 – 1st ever “duratio” in our neck of the woods. Lots of cleanup and keeping hubby busy!

June – Duratio takes down lots of our fruit and nut crop and wreaks havoc on our fencing.

June – Hay time

June – Hay lot is full!

July – Spring cleaning almost done!

July – Harvesting & canning for winter in full swing!

July – A little crafting along the way makes life fun!

July – First barn quilt in Craig County on the barn!! More fun!

August-September – Mammoth pumpkin from the garden. He almost didn’t fit the wheel barrow!

July – August – Fresh vegies from the garden.

September – Potatoes harvested and in the cellar.

September – Plowing to sow the winter crops (turnips & parsnips).

September – Spaghetti sauce and barbecue sauce from the last of the tomatoes.

And, here it is the end of September.  Deer season and turkey season is soon to be here.  Baby calves are coming and yearlings are headed to the market.  Two nights of cold temps and frost in the mornings means firing up the wood stoves.  The cycle starts again.

Potatoes

Well, it truly is the end of summer!  How do I know?  Hubby dug the potatoes this morning.  All we have left are a few tomatoes still ripening and one pepper plant hanging on.  Our potato crop wasn’t near as productive as last years 14 bushel as we only got about 7-8 bushel this year.  It should still be plenty to get through the winter and we have 24 quarts that we canned from last years crop (hate to see anything go to waste).  Sassy helped as usual but she was also trying to catch the little rodents that have been eating the tomatoes and beans and had started on the potatoes.  She is some kind of dog!!  Hubby dug the potatoes alone while was cooking down tomatoes and preparing to can some barbecue sauce which I’ll post later.  For now here’s a few picks of the morning work.

Digging potatoes September 15 2012

Plow used to dig the potatoes

Eddie plowing potatoes, Sassy plowing for varmints

7-8 bushel 09/15/2012

Potatoes are out of the ground before the rain moves in!

They’re safely tucked away in the cellar to provide us some nourishing food for the winter!  The cellar shelves are full and one of the freezers is full.  Now we wait for deer season and fill up the other freezer.  We are so blessed!

Deer and bow season

The cellar shelves are full, it’s almost time to dig the potatoes and fill the potato bin and the freezers have been organized to determine how much venison and turkey we will need for the winter months.  This all leads up to the hunting season in our area.  We, my husband, myself, daughter, and granddaughter are all avid hunters.  My son and son-in-law love the meat from our hunts but don’t like the hunt itself.  By the end of November, the freezers will be full of all cuts of venison and turkey.  We will have cubed steak, burger, chunks, tenderloin, roasts, and hams and all so healthy for us.

Back to the hunt!  We each have our favorite hunting spots on the farm and hubby is our counselor, tracker and processor!  We’ve spotted so many large bucks on the farm already and the turkeys are showing up sporadically.  I won’t have much vacation this year to hunt but Saturdays are always open and I’ll have a late bow season during our Christmas break.

Our daughter and granddaughter are evening hunters and working half days are ideal for her hunting quests and our granddaughter gets home from school between 3:30 and 4:00 which gives her time to get to her stand as well.

We normally have a few friends join us during the hunting season but have decided this year to keep it strictly family hunting.  We have some new neighbors and not knowing their where-a-bouts tends to make us a little skiddish and for safety purposes and liability.  Our county is 60%+ National Forest and we think other hunters would be better in those woods than ours.  In the past we have told all non-family hunters where to go and asked them to stay in their area to prevent any hunting accidents.  These instructions aren’t always followed and that makes us liable for their safety when they move into an area that we may not know is safe from trespassers or others that aren’t staying where they need to be.  Hunting safety is a VERY BIG issue with us!

Don’t get me wrong, we love the sport but we also like to eat and venison is a healthy choice not only for our diet but our pocketbooks.  We want everyone on the farm to be safe and come in with a good hunting harvest and do it safely!!

Happy hunting everyone!!

Small buck in the orchard 2011

Turkeys on the farm fall 2010