Tag Archives: feeders

It’s just about time . . .

This little fat guy came to visit in 2015 and we had almost thirty that year. I had five or six feeders out and had to fill them twice a day.

April 15th is my deadline for putting out the hummingbird feeders. Last year I was late getting them out and didn’t have near as many.  This year I’ve got the jump on them I hope by putting out two feeders on the front porch this morning. I’m early but they might be too!!

First feeder out and ready!

I’ll start with two feeders and always in bright red. That seems to be their favorite color and I plan to have red and purple flowers all over the porch and yard this year. I’ll be watching out for the first fuchsia plant to hand on the porch too. Their vibrant colors really attract them.

Last year the few hummers that I had loved the butterfly bush, geraniums, bleeding hearts and the columbine.

That beak looks deadly, doesn’t it?

We have the ruby-throated hummingbirds here at the farm.

We think they’re stunning birds!

This was last years batch and I think the most we had at any given time was 10-12 and that was toward the end of the season.

Get those feeders out this weekend and let us know how many you have and when you first sighted them!

Here’s my recipe for the feeders, all natural:  1 cup sugar to 4 cups of water.  I mix it up in a pitcher and put it in the microwave for 6 1/2 minutes to sterilize it and keep it from fermenting.  I let it cool to touch and then pour in the feeders.

 

Furry Friends Enjoy the Back Yard

We have some fox squirrels that keep the feeders empty all year round.  I’ve made a point of gathering walnuts, hickory nuts and chestnuts for our squirrels every year.  We’ve had a few lean years in the way of food for all of the wildlife.  We have orchards for the deer to feed in but these guys will move out of the area if there isn’t any feed and we love watching them from our kitchen window.  I found out last year that all of the excess sweet corn at the end of the growing season is also great for the cattle but the squirrels, wild birds and deer will eat the sweet corn after it dries up.  We pick it off, shuck it, and then lay out on a screen to dry and then store the whole ear in barrels with a lid for the really bad winter when the ground is covered with snow and ice for long periods of time.  We saw a small buck in the garden last night digging up frozen turnips too.  If you love watching the wildlife as much as we do, help them out a little.  Baby, it’s cold out there.

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Eddie built this squirrel feeder about 10 years ago and the wildlife still love it. You’ll laugh yourself to death when you see a full-grown squirrel in that gallon jar!!!

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This guy watches me when I’m moving around in the kitchen or the bathroom.

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Feeding the Wild Birds

Winter is finally here and my wildbirds are looking for food.  I had noticed that I didn’t have very many around but had not put out the birdfeeders because of my chickens which will devour the seeds.

Wildbird seed

Wildbird seed

Two feeders cleaned and ready to fill

Two feeders cleaned and ready to fill

With the snow we received and blew away yesterday, I decided to fill all the feeders.

All during the year I save any grease from bacon, sausage and more.  After cooking I drain the grease into mini aluminum loaf pans and store it in the freezer until cold weather arrives.  I have all sorts of woodpeckers that love the firm lard and they get lots of protein from it.

Small tins of frozen grease-these are bacon and sausage drippings saved from our kitchen.

Small tins of frozen grease-these are bacon and sausage drippings saved from our kitchen.

The aluminum disposable tins are a quick and easy way to save grease over time. I pour what little grease comes from our meat and add to the tin until full. Great for the birds.

The aluminum disposable tins are a quick and easy way to save grease over time. I pour what little grease comes from our meat and add to the tin until full. Great for the birds.

I’ll place these on my hanging flower table that Eddie made me and all the birds can get on the table together if they want.

Hanging plant table used year round.

Hanging plant table used year round.  The bird feeders fit well there too but the chickens fly up on the fence and then onto the table when they see the wild birds feeding there.

Along with the birdseed I put out ears of field corn, sunflowers, peanuts and dried bread crumbs.

Two for one shot!

Two for one shot!

2015 grown sunflowers. I hung about 30 of them and they're just about gone but they were fed mostly to the chickens in the henhouse.

2015 grown sunflowers. I hung about 30 of them and they’re just about gone but they were fed mostly to the chickens in the henhouse.

Squirrel feeder and the jar is filled with peanuts in a shell. The woodpecker breeds love these as do the cardinals.

Squirrel feeder and the jar is filled with peanuts in a shell. The woodpecker breeds love these as do the cardinals.

Field corn strapped to the fince post.

Field corn strapped to the fence post.

So far this winter I have woodpeckers of several varieties, doves, nuthatches, wrens, snowbirds, bluejays, Juncos, cardinals and Carolina wrens feeding at my stations.

New visitor at the farm

A few weeks ago when the weather got colder and most of the weed seed was gone I filled up the feeders at the bird station.  I had dried some sunflowers of different variety and sizes and hung them in the wood house to dry so I would have some new things to put out for the different birds.  I had also picked a lot of different varieties of grasses and hung them to dry also.

Hubby's uncle made this whopper of a feeder years ago and it holds 20 pounds of feed.

Hubby’s uncle made this whopper of a feeder years ago and it holds 20 pounds of feed.

Hubby made this squirrel feeder for me years ago and I'm begging for more.

Hubby made this squirrel feeder for me years ago and I’m begging for more.

 

The birds love the feeders and I have doves, bluejays, juncos, wrens, sparrows, cardinals and three different woodpeckers feeding from them this year.  We also have this little rascal feeding as well.  I grew up calling them fairy diddles and my husband’s family calls them mountain boomers.  They are a miniature squirrel and you won’t believe how fast he moves.

We call him "Boomer".  He's eating a piece of corn.

We call him “Boomer”. He’s eating a piece of corn.

 

He’s hilarious to watch and I’ve decided he’s living in our wood house and may have been the critter that ate all the seed pods and sunflowers.  They mysteriously disappeared right before we started seeing boomer.  He chases the birds but I think in fun.  I’ve started adding mixed nuts,  peanuts and fruit on the table where the big feeder is stationed.  Boomer takes all of the nuts and puts them in the gallon jar on the swing post. If you look closely you can see the bottom half is whole shelled corn and the upper part of the jar is FULL of nuts.

Boomer is so tiny!

Boomer is so tiny!

 

That's a six inch stretch from tree to corn.

That’s a six inch stretch from tree to corn.

The squirrel feeder is a tractor with spikes coming up on both sides of the seat.

The squirrel feeder is a tractor with spikes coming up on both sides of the seat.

 

 

Boomer sitting on top of the squirrel feeder.

Boomer sitting on top of the squirrel feeder.