Tag Archives: crocheting

Crocheted Dish Towels

Do you like the convenience of a dish towel hanging close by in the kitchen?  For years I’ve made my own hanging towels and they’re quick and easy and only take half a towel.

This one is hanging on the top drawer of my kitchen sink this morning.

I have lots of them and change them about every other day depending on how much they’ve been soiled.  Here’s how I make them:

I go to the Dollar Tree and pick out a full hand towel designed for the kitchen. They’re only a dollar and you get two towels out of each one.

Then I fold them in half and cut them in half.  Then I turn down the cut edge about a 1/2 inch and using a large darning needle threaded with a matching yarn, I blanket stitch the fold down.  The stitches are usually about 1/4 – 3/8 inch long, longer stitches will show more and not fill in the top of the towel quite enough.

Darning needle threaded with scrap yarn.

I use a beige or tan yarn most of the time because it matches everything and I have a lot of “almost empty” skeins of yarn.

Tie off the end of the towel with a couple whip stitches and knot.  From here I make a single crochet using a Size F crochet hook in each blanket stitch across the towel.  At this point you can use any crochet stitch you want throughout the towel until  it’s about five to six inches wide.  I mix the crochet stitches on some and single crochet throughout, just depends on my mood and how fast I want to make up the towels.  At the end of each row, DO NOT chain and turn.  This is how you will decreast the rows to go into a point.  To decrease the row, pull the yarn through two or three stitches.  My instructions aren’t great but if you crochet at all you will know how to do this.  For more details just comment on this post.  When I get towards the end with about 6-9 stitches on the row, I add that turning stitch until I have a tab look at the end.   At the end of the last row you crochet make a chain of about 10-12 chain stitches and carry it back to the start of that row and pull through your first stitch several times to make it stay.

This is the point I spoke of earlier where you make the loop which will go over the drawer handle. Then you hook the loop over the button to keep the towel in place when you need it.

It’s really simple to make and great to have so you don’t have to go searching for the hand towel.

Fold that tab over and place your button in the middle of crochet work to meet the chain.  Your done! Not sure I would make a very good crochet instructor unless it was a one on one session!!

Imagine these hanging on your kitchen sink with red or green toppers or even chocolate or bright yellow.

I made these in February and saving them for gifts.

 

Crocheted Bath Rugs

I’m crocheting a lot at night now. Over the last two years I’ve found and been given some white feed sacks.

Old feed sacks that have been unseamed and washed.

Old feed sacks that have been unseamed and washed.

100 % cotton feed sacks. They don't make these anymore, everything is plastic.

100 % cotton feed sacks. They don’t make these anymore, everything is plastic.

I decided since they were cotton they would make some strong and easy to clean scatter rugs. First I pulled out all the seams, washed them and hung them out on the clothesline to dry so they would hold their shape. Then I pressed them out with my iron just enough to be able to cut fairly straight one inch strips. I connected the strips as I rolled them into five-inch balls so they would be easy to handle and not get knotted up while crocheting.

Feed sacks cut into 1" strips and rolled into balls for easier hangling.

Feed sacks cut into 1″ strips and rolled into balls for easier handling.

I decided I wanted them to fit perfectly in front of the camode, shower and the sink. I took the measurements and started crocheting with a simple single crochet using a size N hook.

Single crochet stitching

Single crochet stitching

On the second row I started hooking in the back look of each single crochet.  This gives the rug a layered look.

The sacks were in several shade of white, cream and a peachy tone. This is the results of the first rug I completed and before it was blocked.

The sacks were in several shade of white, cream and a peachy tone. This is the results of the first rug I completed and before it was blocked.

Sink and shower finished rugs.

Sink and shower finished rugs.

Camode rug

Camode rug

Sink rug

Sink rug

I decided not to dye them because I liked the look of the old feed sacks and the finished product will work in any room.  I’ve washed them one time and got a sort of rag look from the pieces which makes them look even older.  These rugs will take a lot of washing and last for a long time.  They’re not so heavy that I can’t dry them in the dryer or hang them on the clothesline.  I love the end results.

Crocheting

Two shades of blue

Two shades of blue

I’ve been doing some crocheting since I retired and loving the quiet calm it provides.

Infinity scarf for Norfolk friends

Infinity scarf for Norfolk friends

Two strands of yarn

Two strands of yarn

I’ve made some scarves for some wonderful friends in Norfolk and just finished a pair of mittens and a scarf for myself.

Neck scarf and mittens using Red Heart yarn.

Neck scarf and mittens using Red Heart yarn.

Orchid and lilac in the scarf.

Orchid and lilac in the scarf.

The mittens look large but they fit wonderfully and are very warm!  I don't think they'll work real well doing farm work though!  ;)

The mittens look large but they fit wonderfully and are very warm! I don’t think they’ll work real when doing farm work though! 😉

Beautiful and next project

Beautiful and next project

Bulky yarn for a sweater for myself!  Hope I start and finish before winter is over!

Bulky yarn for a sweater for myself! Hope I start and finish before winter is over!

DSCN7914 DSCN7911

Now it’s time to teach myself how to knit!!

Feed sacks to rugs

I recently inherited over a hundred old feed sacks made of muslin fabric.  They had been washed but I gave them another good bath in really hot water to get them good and clean and to get rid of the aroma of being packed away for a very, very long time.  They held up marvelously and now I have a huge treasure to do something with.  They are not white but sort of beige/peach/pink shade of fabric.

This is a large basket holding the sacks after they've been washed and ready to cut in strips.

This is a large basket holding the sacks after they’ve been washed and ready to cut in strips.

I love to crochet and have decided to use some of the sacks to make some bath rugs.  I can always dye them to suit the decor of the room or possibly bleach them to a lighter shade.

First, I cut the sacks into a continuous 3/4″ strip of cloth and wind them into a ball which gives me a 3″-4″ ball for each sack.

Three of the sacks have been stripped and rolled into balls to make handling the strips with ease as I crochet.

Three of the sacks have been stripped and rolled into balls to make handling the strips with ease as I crochet.

I’ve decided to use a single crochet stitch for the first one and use the back of the stitch for the pattern.  If you crochet you know what I’m talking about and it give the line of stitches a “layered” look.  For a 4 x 5 bath rug it takes about six balls of the fabric and I think it turned out pretty nice.

I use a wooden size N crochet hook and single crochet.  I make enough stitches to make a 48" rug this time.  Notice the different shades of beige/peach in the sacks.

I use a wooden size N crochet hook and single crochet. I make enough stitches to make a 48″ rug this time. Notice the different shades of beige/peach in the sacks.

They’ll be sturdy and wash up nice and last FOREVER!  They’re also thick enough that it’ll feel nice to step out of the shower onto it.  It took about four nights, an hour at a time to finish the rug.  The best part is you can put it down to take phone calls, do some laundry, give some attention to Sassy or most anything and go right back to it without missing a stitch.

Almost finished, need to add one more ball of sack strips.

Almost finished, need to add one more ball of sack strips.

I've rotated the different shades of sack strips in this rug and used 6 balls.  One ball contains one sack.  Finished rug.

I’ve rotated the different shades of sack strips in this rug and used 6 balls. One ball contains one sack. Finished rug.

All I need to do now is square up the rug which is so easy to do with this fabric.  I just stretch the sack out and spray with lukewarm water and as it dries  the shape retains itself.  I don’t think I”ll dye this one and will make two more in the same design and color to use in the bathroom.  I keep a rug in front of the shower, sink and the camode.

I think the next group of three, I’ll make my fabric strips a little more narrow and see if I get the same look and feel.  I’d also like to make a couple of aprons from the sacks.  There’s so many uses for a good quality fabric to re-purpose.

 

Hyder Baby Afghan

 Soft chenille yarn

Soft chenille yarn

We’ve had three babies born in the past year in my office.  Two girls and one boy and the first two received a baby quilt and I just finished the baby afghan for the last one born.  I thought I would share how I made the afghan.  I chose a chenille yarn by Bernat yarn in pastel colors,  size F crochet hook and four skeins of the yarn.  It’s a very simple pattern using a single crochet stitch throughout and I think the chenille yarn will make a really warm blanket for the baby.

1/4 complete

1/4 complete

I got it almost done and decided to check it for being squared and had to pull 1/2 of it out and start again.  It’s going to be such a warm blanket for the baby and just in time for cold weather.

 

Single Crochet - four skeins

Single Crochet – four skeins

 

Finally done - 32 x 45

Finally done – 32 x 45

The second time around went much quicker and I hope the baby enjoys it for a long time.  She’s four months old but I think it should still cover her on long winter nights.