Category Archives: Animals

Unwanted Visitors

It must be the year of the bees and I’m not talking honeybees!

This black hornet nest was built on the end of our satelite dish arm! I took four nights of heavy spraying to get rid of them.
This new nest was about 20 yards from the satellite bees in a maple tree and they are very strong. They are out of the path we use so we won’t bother them.

This angus heifer walks by them to get water but the cattle know its there and travel 10-20 feet away from the stinging bees.
About 15 feet out from and about seven feet higher in the tree this third hive and it is another black hornet nest!
It appears to be broken up or torn but the bees are adding to their nests and probably filling it with baby hornets.

This year we are covered up with small and large bumblebees, sand hornets, black hornets and now the yellow jackets are showing up in full force. The sand hornets are trying to peel the bark off of my three year old lilac bush and I’m afraid they’re going to kill it. Along with the yellow jackets, the sand hornets are chasing our hummingbirds away from their feeders. We tried to pick a few peaches this morning and all the bees were after the fruit. Sand hornets will eat big holes in the fruit and the other bees takeover the rest of the ruined fruit!

We had 43* yesterday morning and 47* this morning and I sure hope the bees leave soon so we can work and enjoy these cool days that have barely made it to the mid 70’s.

I almost forgot these little beauties! Our hive died again this spring and in May a wild swarm came to live in the hive and over the hot weeks we had they more than tripled their numbers. This picture was taken in late afternoon when it was too hot to be in the hive and they laid out fanning each other and cooling off before going back into the have shortly after sunset. We got seven frames of honey from them and it’ll be wonderful to have our own honey for meals and homemade bread this winter.

Furry Friend in Backyard

Back in April, this little guy was sitting under the door to our woodhouse. It was a perfect spot to get away from Sadie or anything else for that matter.
It played in the yard for awhile and would run back to his safe haven.
They are fast and very alert to danger anywhere they are.
I’m sure he’s fully grown now and found a new place to live. I only got to see him a couple times that month.

Watching wildlife, even through my kitchen window, is precious time to me!

Winter Birds

Though winter is “almost” gone I’ve been blessed with two pair of beautiful cardinals all winter. I’m seeing them less now but they still come to the feeding stations on cold, wet, windy days.

There’s an old saying around here that says when you see a cardinal a angel is watching over you. I’ve been very blessed
I love that brilliant red of the male cardinal.
The females are beautiful in a different way!
You can’t miss that beautiful red bird against the snow.
We had more birds at the feeding stations this year than I can ever remember.
This fellow was with us all winter too and wearing a beautiful red hat!
I”m sure I’ll continue to see them throughout the spring but it sure made winter a little more cheerful watching all of them from my kitchen window!!

Ducks! Ducks! Ducks!

Donald and Daisy enjoying the sun and water!
They love the water until the snapping turtles arrive and then they live in the mountain stream that feeds our ponds.
These young things joined the farm on the 7th of March from my brother who lives in Franklin County. He bought me two ducks and two drakes because he didn’t have the water he knew they would love. The two in the back are the hens.
They had never seen so much water!! The first day I kept them in the duck house and the second day we led them to the water feeding little piles of feed along the way. It didn’t take anytime for them to know where home was, where the feed was and more importantly where the water was. It’s so much fun watching them. In the evening before dusk hits we get a couple cups of corn in a plastic bucket and when it rattles they know it’s the last meal of the day before the shut away from predators of the night.
And their gift to me for having them on the farm are these beautiful eggs that go in our bread and other baked goods.
Good grooming after a dip in the pond!!
Strolling along like all good ducks do!!
Donald is still king of the flock and the young drakes know it!
And Sadie wonders why they don’t like to play with her. She and Donald have always been good wrestling buddies!!

Beavers Are Back

This is a beaver hutch on one of our next door neighbors property.

Hubby says it’s the biggest hutch he’s ever seen and thinks it’s a big family of them. This spring the kits will be sent out to make their own homes in another area but usually close to the parents.

With all of the snow melt and ice melt there’s plenty of room for them to venture out in the flooded waters.
This shows the water building on our side of the property.
There’s plenty of woodland for them to chew down the trees and make more homes and enlarge the main home. Of course, a lot of the trees will be used for feeding their large families.

We let them stay as long as they’re not flooding any of the pasture or routing the water that will harm neighboring property. They’re amazing construction creatures and fun to watch at work when they think no humans are close and watching.

Coyote Trouble

Well the aggravating coyotes are terrorizing our livestock again.

Hubby caught this one in a snare on the fenceline of our property and neighbor where our cattle stay in the winter months.

Please don’t give us grief for killing the beast. When we’re trying so hard to make a living these day with our cattle, we do everything possible to save the calves born and then stolen away by these vicious animals.

Our area is full of them and they keep our dogs upset night and day but we don’t dare let them out to protect because a pack or even a large male coyote would tear our dogs to bits.

We had a professional hunter come in to hunt them but with no luck! These animals are so alert to the sounds the callers make and won’t come near them, so he was not successful in seeing or hearing them. This is why we and neighboring farms set snares for them.

We have heard in recent nights, three – four different packs in our area. There is no bounty and the wildlife officers are too busy with hunting violations to give any assistance so we do what we can on our own.

Still Looking for Ducks

Donald and Daisy are the only ducks I currently have.

I’ve had these two ducks for almost three years and Daisy has given me beautiful eggs almost the entire time. She currently is in winter hiatus, I believe. I’ve been looking for more Pekin ducks for over a year with no luck.

Daisy lays beautiful large white eggs and I use them in all of my baking when I have them.

If I don’t find 3-5 more by spring I will raise some and hopefully the majority of them will be ducks and not drakes.

One duck eggs is equal to two large chicken eggs or three medium chicken eggs.

So spring will find me bringing new ducks, chickens and turkeys to the farm. With all this poultry and the greenhouse, I should be a busy but very happy farm girl!!

Fox In the Hen House

From 50+ hens to 18 in one summer/fall season is not a good thing on the farm.

This is few of my hens.
Young chicks added to flock in 2020.

Each spring I add days old chicks to the farm livestock. This year we added five each of ISA browns, Rhode Island reds, black Australorps and Americaunas. They grew out beautiful and very healthy. My spring chicks grow out in five to six months and start laying when my older hens get the time off for molting and recharging.

After the brooder box they’re moved to the Little Red Barn where they can interact with the older chickens for a few weeks and then they’re moved into the big house.

Brooder box begins as a small tote for first week and then moved into a huge galvanized that is also 24 inches tall.
Little Red Barn is the next living quarters for the young.
Then the girls move in with their elders.

This summer after all of the ladies and rooster were together and free ranging the farm an unwelcome beast invaded the territory. He seemed to come on rainy overcast days when we weren’t somewhere out of doors and his first visit took out nine hens in one day. Our dogs tend to stay in their houses when it rains and they were not aware of what was going on. I found the dead hens laying in several places from the barnyard to the cemetery on the hill. The next day he got four more and so on and so on. We caught him out on several occasions but only got some shots off and no kills. We’re convinced that she was probably feeding her young and that’s why she got so many at one time. The following photo I pulled from the internet will give you an idea of the family she must feed . . .

Red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Vixen with five cubs Stock Photo - Alamy

BUT not my hens!!!!

We’ve not had a visit from her lately but my hens (only 18 remain, nine old and nine pullets) have learned to stay near cover that she can’t get into.

My young girls have started laying, two per day so far, and I only had to buy eggs from the local grocer three times. Store bought eggs are definitely different from my free range eggs.

Spring 2021 will be filled with around 25-30 young chicks, five Pekin ducks and 3-5 turkeys. I bake so much and love those duck eggs to make my bread, cakes, pies and cookies. My egg customers are begging for eggs and I hope to fill those orders by January 2021, when all nine of the young hens will be rolling out those perfect eggs.

A Season of Change

The green is turning gold and brown, the wild grass seeds are a very few and the wind has a bite to it. My body is not ready for winter chill and blast of wind but I fear it is upon us!

This morning while fixing breakfast I looked out the kitchen window and saw a beautiful sight.

The backyard, where usually a hammock is swinging in the breeze, the ground was covered with little birds of all makes and sizes!! This is my winter bird feeding station and from the looks of it I really need to add more feeders.   I filled and hung the feeders last week and have seen titmouse, sparrows, yellow finches, red headed wrens, cardinals, Carolina finches and so many more breeds of small birds.  There’s also doves, bluejays, red-headed woodpeckers, Downy woodpeckers and more.  BUT, this morning the ground was ever so active with small birds.  I love them!

I love watching the birds and they will make my winter just a bit easier to contend with!

Elkhound Pup No More

Sadie stands watch over the farm day and night!

Sadie is full grown now and we love her to death! She’s become quite the huntress and catches squirrels, possums and coons along with all the mini creatures you find on the farm. She’s protective of the chickens and ducks though she still likes to run through the flock at times just to get their attention!

Yes, she’s a porch dog but she has saved one of my setting hens from a coon very recently.
She has a very shrill howl when the coyotes are around and calling in their pack.
She keeps watch over all projects on the farm and is currently watching Eddie bush hog the apple orchard.

She’s my baby and loves everyone she meets!

Donald and Daisy

Daisy and Donald are the only ducks on the farm at the moment.

Daisy has been laying one large egg for me since the spring of 2019. He took one 20 day break during the month of January 2020 and has been going strong ever since.

Her eggs are beautiful and twice the size of a large chicken egg.

A bowl full of duck eggs going into a pound cake. I just have to wait for one more to have the five I need for the moistest pound cake you ever put in your mouth!

Donald is becoming a little aggressive with the adult people on the floor by trying to lead the way when you’re trying to walk somewhere. He seems to hate shoes and pecks any near him. We thought he was being aggressive with Sadie but we now know they are quite chummy! He will come up to her face and lay his head against Sadie’s neck! They chase each other in and out of the pond and if Sadie is laying out in the sun napping Donald climbs up on her back, then the chase is on.

Sadie is tolerant of him I think because she has no one else to chase and play with it.

I’m in the process of looking for a couple more female ducks for him. I think Daisy wants to set but Donald keeps breaking up her nests.

So, the word is out, Rita is looking for three or four Daisy’s to add to the farm.

Donald is all puffed up trying to show everyone he is the master of his domain!
Resting by the pond

Birds of a Feather

This lovely bird visited the farm during the night and think he may have flew into a wire. He was sitting on the bull lot fence and sat perfectly still for me to get photos. An hour later he was gone!!

He was big and kept clicking his beak together at Sadie!!  Love to hear them hooting at night and late afternoon!

Sadie is Growing Up

Sadie at 3 1/2 months

This has got to be one of the most loving pups we have ever had in our home.  She came to us with some bad habits but in three months they’ve all been corrected or being worked on.  Sadie will be eight months old next week and she has stopped chasing the chickens,  she’s learning not to jump up on everyone that comes to the farm, she’s treeing squirrels and she not afraid of Donald our drake anymore.  She has learned to stay away from the cattle and she alerts us to new guests that arrive.  She does get overly-excited when anyone comes to visit especially our kids and granddaughter.

I still bring her in the house at night or we would get no sleep. She barks at everything that moves!!!

I’m sure this will change once she becomes more aware of the wild animals that are lurking about at night and the not so wild ones!  In the meantime, she’s our baby and some hunting/training will begin more strictly once hay season is finished and Eddie has more time to train her to a lead and get her out in the woods on a more frequent basis. Until then I will keep up the simple training in the yard and on a daily basis.

Sadie sits peacefully with me as we had our breakfast.

She is not full grown yet and has so much energy.  Norwegian Elkhounds are wonderful dogs and very protective of their owners.

New Chicks On the Farm

Our farm is constantly growing something whether it be crops for the cattle, the garden, the herd or the flock.  Each spring I try to add new chicks to the flock so that in the winter months I can still have eggs while the older chickens can take a break.  Most chickens start laying at six months of age.  I recently added eighteen bitties to the farm.There are six Buff Orpingtons, six Speckled Susses and six Columbian Wyandottes.

Unusual Bird

 

We had a visitor on the farm not too many weeks ago and at first glance we did not realize it was a crane that had come in during the night with the fog.  We see them all the night but had never seen one preening itself on our boat house.

He looked so very short sitting up there and I was convinced it had to be something different until. . . .

It flew off and set atop a broken down locust tree in the bull lot next to the boat house.  These birds are huge, endangered and eat lots of fish from our pond and we think are probably the cause of the demise of our frog population too!!

They are huge yet elegant birds with extremely long legs.

He sat in the top of that tree for most of the morning and I don’t think we’ve seen it since that morning.

 

Heifer Calving Issues

March plagued us with unusual calving events but not due to weather events.  First and previously posted was the “trouble” issue from a first time mother and a calf to large to deliver normally.  Eddie assisted in that delivery which produced the largest calf we have ever delivered and to date the largest calf this year.

This is Trouble. Biggest bull calf ever raised on the farm. He was born to a black angus heifer which means it was her first ever calf. We don’t like for our heifers to have large calves but apparently she was fed well which helped him grow. The sire was a two-year old Angus with small head and shoulders. Can’t imagine what he will look like fully grown or his son!!

Our second abnormal delivery was an older cow in our spring herd and she had never had any issues in the past.  This time she delivered a normal to small bull calf that was dead.  Shortly after this delivery she had another small dead bull calf and then all of her insides came out.  I’m not talking about prolapse, this was all of her female organs and intestines.  Eddie put her down quickly after to prevent ANY suffering.

Then about 10 days later another heifer delivered a huge bull calf that Eddie and I both helped deliver in our holding.  This calf lived but mother and calf were weak for about two weeks but the calf is growing.

First time heifers are always a challenge but this has been quite worrisome

VERY GRAPHIC::

The last one born was also a five-hour labor ordeal with a heifer and we had an issue after the deliver that Eddie assisted.  About an hour or so after the delivery the calf was never able to get up to nurse.  We have found in the past that if the new babe and mom are left alone things usually go as expected.  We watched this calf and mother from our front porch and Eddie decided to take the heifers some grain to keep them away from the new mother and babe.  After pouring the grain he went to investigate the situation and found all of the calf’s intestine had come out of its belly button/naval.  NEVER had we seen or heard of this!  We called a neighbor and they had never dealt with it but had heard of it and was willing to come assist.  In the meantime, I googled it and how to fix without a vet’s assistance (the cost of the vet and having to take to a hospital would far out weigh what we could get out of the calf IF it survived).  We got a clean tarp and put it in the bucket of the tractor and Eddie and I lifted him into the tractor bucket without issue.  We then hauled him to the garage where our neighbor found us to work on the calf.  First we sterilized all the equipment with 100% alcohol and then poured it all over the intestines and tried to get as much dirt and debris from the navel and the intestine without bursting them.  This took lots of time and Andy was so meticulous about cleaning everything.  Inch by inch he started pushing the intestines back into the body cavity and at one point he had to make the navel opening a bit larger and after about an hour he was ready to close up the opening.  During this entire process Eddie was holding the back feet & legs and I was holding the front legs and feet, the calf did not move even being on it’s back during the entire time.  Andy cleaned the incision several times more and then closed it all with vet staples.  He gave the calf a large dose of antibiotics and covered the wound with more alcohol. We took the calf back to his mother and she started cleaning him all over again.  You have to remember that his calf had never been able to get up to nurse.  We tried to give him colostrum to no avail and in the next three days he got up three times that we saw but we NEVER saw him nurse even with mom’s encouragement.  On the fourth day he died and as an afterthought we think we should have used a system that you put a hose down their throat into their stomach for nourishment or may should have put it down immediately but we always try to save them after the mother has gone through nine months of keeping them alive.

I want to thank our wonderful neighbor, Andy Hutton, for all he did that day and help he has given us in the past.  He hauls our cattle, helps us find good buyers for our stock, helping in repair our equipment and there for us to answer our questions.  Though we’ve been farming for 40+ years it’s always good to get first and second opinions.  Andy is our “go-to-farmer”!!!

We only have two more heifers to calve and about 9-10 older cows in our spring herd to deliver. Wish us luck!!

TROUBLE

This is Trouble. Biggest bull calf ever raised on the farm. He was born to a black Angus heifer which means it was her first ever calf. We don’t like for our heifers to have large calves but apparently she was fed well which helped him grow. The sire was a two-year old Angus with small head and shoulders. Can’t imagine what he will look like fully grown or his son!!

His mom was in labor for five hours and I was alone on the farm with her. I tried several times to get close to her to help by pulling the calf but she would have nothing to do with it. Finally when Eddie got home from a doctor’s appointment she was tired enough to lay still and he pulled the calf. Immediately she got up and walked away having nothing to do with the pain she had been in.

Of course, he was also born on a very cold and wet day and was covered with mud. The other heifer mothers came to the rescue and cleaned him up while Eddie got a bottle of milk to warm his insides.

His mother finally came back to him the next morning but would never let him nurse. She was and is protective of him but would not let him eat. Trouble is now a bottle baby and doing really well.

He was born on March 4th and instead of one month old he looks like a three-month old spring calf. Unlike most bottle fed babies he is not pot-gutted, he’s very strong and doesn’t play with the other calves though they try really hard to get him in on the racing they do each day!!

We’ve not decided if he will possibly become a sire on the farm but he definitely looks and acts like a full-grown young bull!

 

Sadie

She’s growing like a weed, smart as a whip, and so very, very affectionate.

Sadie turned five months old this month and it’s hard to believe we’ve had her for a little over a month!  She has turned into quite a guard dog by barking when someone comes in, if she sees someone walking along the road, if the bulls move from one side of the bull lot to the other, and especially if the newborn calves are running and playing.

Last night we had a stray dog come to visit and the hair was standing all along the top of her back, from head to tail.  She was going to eat it alive!  We don’t know who it belongs to but it soon left.  It was solid black with a blue rhinestone collar that lit up when our spotlight hit it.  Sadie yipped  and growled until we went to bed.

She’s just as beautiful as she was when we got her and we’re just as in love with her now as we were a month ago.  Her favorite toy our is our coonhound Mischief and they will play all day.  She has learned that it’s not polite to run the chickens and ducks and now we’re concentrating on NOT chasing cars from our house or anywhere for that matter.  She’s a bit intimidated by the tractors and she still does not like riding in the vehicles or the gator but we’re still working on that.  Sadie loves walking in the woods and when there’s no wind we go on family walks with her.  Eddie hoping we’ll eventually run across some squirrels during our walks.  She has already treed one below Mischiefs doghouse but didn’t stay with it very long since she couldn’t find it once it went up the tree.

More updates to come on her growth and progress!  Enjoy your animals!

What A Difference A Day Makes

Yesterday and Saturday the rains were pouring down and the fields were saturated and overflowing.

Today it’s almost back to normal.

Thursday morning the timber was frozen and the ground was covered with ice.

The next day it’s totally different!

We are having a whirlwind spring or end of winter and we don’t know from one day to the next what the temperature will be.  Last night we were experiencing 35-60 mile per hour wind gusts.  Thankfully there was no damage to anything that we have found.  We deal with this while waiting on baby calves to be born!!  Farming is a challenge, especially beginning this year.

This heifer delivered her new babe on one of the worst days of the rain and cold winds.

This little black-white faced bull is a survivor!!

Sadie Is Growing

On February 20th Sadie turned four months old and the things she has learned in the short time we’ve had her is amazing.  She goes to the door and looks back at us when she wants/needs to go out. The potty training is going amazingly!  She has figured out how to get out of the yard gate to go visit with Mischief, our coon hound.  When the ATV starts up she knows Dad is going to the woods or to feed the bulls.  She knows when I go to the kitchen it’s mealtime.  She’s learned the sounds of our vehicles and waits at the door for visitors barking her head off.  She has learned how to wake Mom up to go outside (barking by my bed) or when she thinks it’s time for everyone to get up. She has learned that “down” means to stay down and not jump up on us.  She has learned that there are moles in our front yard and she’s determined to get them for me no matter how many holes she has to dig.  Yard gardening is going to be a challenge this spring!!! 🙂

She is growing like a weed! When we got her on the 11th she weighed about 8 pounds and now she’s up to 10 pounds.

Because we’ve had so much rain and she loves being outside I have to put down heavy paper in the path she uses from the front door to through the kitchen.

The look we get when she wants out.

She does not like to ride in the vehicles.  We took a ride yesterday afternoon on our road to check out the flood damage and she got sick before we could get back home.  Poor thing was as nervous as a cat in a room full of rocking chair!!!

She looks big in these photos but she’s only about 20 inches long and almost 12 inches tall.  She’ll be full-grown before we know it.

We were supposed to keep our son’s black lab this weekend but I asked him to hold off a couple more months because Sadie is so little and Bucky is a full-grown pup that loves to wrestle and I’m afraid he may hurt it for now.  We’ll let them visit before too long though and she’ll have another playmate.

I’m praising her a lot but she still has an issue with my chickens and wants to chase anything that runs so we’ll be doing some heavy training in that regard.  Bucky likes to chase the chickens too and their togetherness might just get a little out of hand.  More updates on her growth and training to come.

 

A NEW GIRL ON THE FARM

Farms always have a lot of varmints and I guess, towns do too but we seem to be overrun with them.  After Sassy died two years ago the varmints have become very brazen and are in the yard as much as out of it!  We’ve wanted another dog on the farm mainly to keep such critters at bay yet we wanted one we would train and not someone else’s with attributes that are not particularly farm and socially attractive!!  I’m not ready for another Sassy (cocker spaniel) yet.

Sassy at three months.

We’ve had several dogs and cats in our 47 years and have always been partial to Cockers and Norwegian Elkhounds which we have had at least five in those 47 years.  We’ve had different people checking in their areas for the Elkhounds and over the weekend we found our new girl!

This is our new girl on the farm, Sadie. She is a Norwegian Elkhound and fours months old next week.

She is so very smart and is learning a lot in the four days she has been with us.

She was NOT potty trained but in four days has learned that all she has to do is going to the front door and whine to go out.  I’m doing a lot of “pooper scooping: in the yard at the moment because we don’t want her to be free to go just anywhere without us.  At six months we are hoping we’ll be able to leave the front yard gate open at night so she can ward off varmints or alert us that they are encroaching on her territory!!  Yesterday she met Arby and Samson, two of our huge black Angus bulls and she barked her little self crazy until they took a step near her and then she was between my feet. The bulls didn’t pay much attention to her.   Later in the morning while we were doing some fence repairs in the heifer lot she decided to let the heifers know that she was the new boss in town.  These heifers weigh around 750-850 pounds each and are due any day to have their first calves and they don’t like dogs!  Anyway, Sadie decided to walk out into the middle of the herd and give them the devil but not even five minutes later you would have thought the devil was on her heels.  She came screaming back toward us and ran into a woven wire fence which she could not get through and headed around the corner of the orchard fence and straight into our arms, peeing and pooping all the way.  She was literally petrified and we were laughing ourselves to death.  She did learn to stay away from those girls because today I took her for a walk with me to put mail out for the postman and instead of staying close to me as we walked the driveway along the heifer lot Sadie made a broad path about twenty feet on the opposite side of the driveway and growling all the way to the mailbox and back!!!

She is a beautiful dog and we hope to have many good years with her.

Our next learning lesson will be to not jump up on us or visitors and to teach her not to chase the chickens or ducks. I have lots of faith that she will learn quickly!!

We are also trying to get her used to riding in the farm trucks with us.  She is scared of riding and of vehicles.  The day we bought her home we had to put her in a dog crate on the back of the truck and I’m so glad we had it because she was very ill riding in the back of the truck.  We will start with short trips on the farm and on our road until she feels more comfortable.  Yesterday during our second trip riding out the 1/8 mile driveway she tried to jump out of my arms and out the truck window.  I also learned a very valuable lesson on this trip, leave the windows up until she is more comfortable riding in the truck!!!

So for now, I will be kept very busy during our very wet season, mopping the floors and keeping the yard as clean as I can.  We’re expecting the kids to come visit her for the first time this weekend.  I think she’ll love them as much as she loves us!!

BEST FIREWOOD FOR A NIGHT LIKE TONIGHT

The temps are dropping fast this afternoon and the wind is gusting from 20 – 30 mph at the moment. Tonight is supposed to be much worse. We’ll have the stove cranked up and the teakettle full!

We keep a kettle on the stove to put some moisture in the house.

We’ll be burning some seasoned wild cherry

with some green oak and dried walnut before we go to bed.

Right before we head to bed Eddie will fill the stove with some truly dried locust. This is wood has been drying for years out in the fields as fencing.

The past few years we’ve been and will probably continue to in the coming years be replacing all of the fencing on the farm.  The wire has rotted and posted broke off at the top of the ground.  We saved all of the locust post just for nights like tonight when the temps will be below zero when the wind is factored in.  The locust burns hot but slow which makes it hold overnight (almost) and we don’t have to get up every two hours to load the stove when the fire has burnt down.

Everyone stay warm tonight and don’t forget to bed all the farm animals down with extra food and hay to stay warm!!  Bring those pets indoors if you really love them!!

SNOW DAY COOKING

I promised a pictorial today of the what kept me busy during our snow event yesterday and here it is.

One of my snow event creations was chicken salad. My canned pickle relish gives it the kick it needs.

I love cobblers and this one is raspberry-blueberry. I love to warm in my microwave and then pour whole milk over it!!

We used a little more than half of a crate full of firewood last night.

Divine smoked pork loin created by Eddie in our smoker. He cooked it in the garage yesterday during the snow event.

Eddie’s other night-time snack is jello with fruit. This is raspberry.

Four loaves of bread made with honey from our honeybees.

Covered in wrap makes it hard to see but this is a carrot cake with caramel pecan frosting. Hubby is in heaven!!

The rest of the day was keeping the stove filled and the wood rack filled as well.

The wood rack beside the stove is full and holds enough wood for two days if the wind isn’t bad.

We used a little more than half of a crate full of firewood last night.

 

The snow event (notice I didn’t call it a storm) left us with one inch of snow and it got packed down during the night with sleet and rain making for a crusty top.  The chickens wanted nothing to do with it so we left them in the coop and the ducks could have left their coop but decided to stick close to a spot with no snow in it!  Recipes for the chicken salad, cake, bread, cobbler and pork loin marinade will be posted on my cooking page soon.

End of Deer Season

The final week of deer season ended yesterday and our freezers are full.  This year no trophies were taken because we felt we needed to thin the herds (5) due to the small does and too many of them.  We talked about this during the summer and decided the bucks were too small and does were very small and believe this is due to inbreeding.  They’ve had plenty to eat from the grasses and gardens in the summer and the nut crops in the fall.  Only the family participated in the hunts because most of the hunters were looking to kill trophies which there were very few so they hunted elsewhere.  My new crockpot and Instant pot have been keeping our bellies full!

1019:082318:59F:2746:CAMERA1 :3