Preparing For Winter

In six days it will be September 1st, where has the year gone?!?!? We prepare for winter all year practically by canning and freezing food, fattening the cattle, making hay and, of course, that critical harvesting firewood to stay warm.

The woodhouse is almost full from trees we harvested last winter and in the spring. We still have a huge pile left to split!
We’ve had a lot of dead trees from the ash trees! I’ve heard what’s doing it but for the life of me at the moment I can’t remember.
This stack was split in May and then hay season crept in.
Eddie uses the wood splitter that a friend, Bill Songer, put a larger motor and easier to start motor on for us. Last year Bill cut up and hauled in a few loads of firewood off the farm for us.
Eddie splits it and I stack it. We stacked this for the sun to season good and then cover when wet weather sits in. There’s plenty of room in the woodhouse for this but we’ll add locust and oak to finish the fill of that building.
When hay season came in we left the pile to do after the weather cools and the bees are gone.

Winter is upon us and 90* weather doesn’t much help the process so we continue to clean out the gardens, can and freeze all we can for us and the kids, and do minor repairs to the house and buildings as needed. Potatoes will be dug in the next week or so and then the apples will be harvested and stored. There’s more fencing to replace and of course, we can’t forget deer season is here in October and I have a new bow to use!!

4 thoughts on “Preparing For Winter

  1. tonytomeo

    One of the advantages of a mild climate is that we do not need much firewood. There are certainly plenty of trees that should be cut down, but there is no need to process them all for myself. Nowadays, people are starting to realize the importance of cutting trees down.

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  2. Jane Fritz

    You and Eddie definitely don’t need to go to a gym! In fact, maybe you could advertise outdoor workout routines at a reasonable rate and see if you can get some people to pay to help with all that cutting and stacking! We also have dead ash trees; it’s the dreaded ash borer. So sad to see those mighty trees fall, all because of hungry and picky insects.

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