Starting A New Apple Orchard

Old orchard on the farm back in 2017. Duratio of 2012 just about took out the entire orchard.

As I’ve told you in the past the orchards we have on the farm are old and not huge and we lose a couple of these old treasures every year due to wind or other weather events.

Last year we decided to start a small apple orchard in new ground and these will be dwarf trees.  The root stock is in the ground and we made sure the best that we could that they make it through the  winter and spring before we graft our favorite apples to the stock.  We’re hoping to graft some Wolf River which is a large apple and we’ll have to watch the fruit for getting too large for the dwarf root stock.  Transparents is also a great fruit for applesauce and we use a lot of that.

The other fruit trees that we’ve started in the past two years as young trees are doing well.  They include red plum, peaches, cherries, pears and some apple trees hubby grafted two years ago.  If Mother Nature will ever cooperate and our climate settles down we’ll have more fruit than we can put up.  We add two more peach trees to the stock but planted them in the top end of the old orchard hoping the frost won’t be as prevalent up there.  We planted two cherries in that same location last year and they have done well, leaving us with lots of bloom at the moment. Temps are suppose to be low this weekend and so many trees are full of bloom.

Mother Nature please be kind!!

 

 

7 thoughts on “Starting A New Apple Orchard

  1. tonytomeo

    Our old apple trees are some of the oldest in the region. (The orchards that I remember were stone fruits, which do not get ‘old’, and walnuts, but apples and pears grew in the Santa Cruz Mountains above the Santa Clara Valley.) Sadly, they were abandoned prior to 1974, perhaps several years prior. I tried to tend to some of them while using the area around them for other horticultural commodities. Now, I hope to grow copies of the old trees on another parcel. I am pleased to grow new trees, but would have liked to preserve the old trees also.

    Like

    Reply
    1. countrygirllifeonthefarm Post author

      We’re putting a few of every tree fruit in our orchard close to the house. We love all fruit that is best grown in our area. The orchard is on the side of a hill and the upper trees seem to miss most of the late frosts that kill the fruit blossom.
      It’s also close enough that we can keep some honeybee hives in the orchard and hopefully the hunting dogs housed in the barn will keep the bear away from the hives.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        Orchards were an important part of our culture for a very long time. Tourists used to come here for the bloom, like tourists go to see the autumn color of New England. Of course, it is difficult to imagine that now. More than a million people live in the Santa Clara Valley now, and almost none of them know anything about horticulture. Besides the pome fruits, I intend to grow the stone fruits that used to grow in the Santa Clara Valley. I am none too keen on apricots because there were too common when I was a kid, but will grow them just because I miss them so much.

        Like

        Reply
  2. Barbara Malone

    My dad always loved damson plum preserves — he called them “dam good ‘serves!” I once bought a small “damson plum” tree and planted it, waited years for it to produce…peaches. Damn. My brother had a tree in his yard years ago.

    Like

    Reply
    1. countrygirllifeonthefarm Post author

      We love damson too but they’re hard to find. I’m still looking though and want to start a Green Gage plum too. Hope to get some seeds from two of my aunts that have them in their yard. I want my grandchildren to have all of them when we are here and after we are gone.

      Like

      Reply
  3. Carol Trutt

    This weather is ridiculous! Are the trees short enough where Eddie and you could drape something over them to protect them? Yes, mother nature please be kind to you

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.