Deer Season Means Work

The first week of bow season found me bringing in a two year old doe. The second week of the season my bow broke beyond repair but she had been a good one. The third week hubby bought in a yearling buck and our son got a yearling buck. I thought I would share with you what we do to process the meat.

From the three deer we had about 24 pounds of ground meat and around 30 bags of cubed venison tenderloiin.

After Eddie skins and quarters the deer, he takes out the tenderloin and slices it into 1 inch pieces and then runs it through our cuber/tenderizer.  The next step depends on what I need in the freezer.  This year we are very low on burger so he carved all the meat off the bones and cut into large chunks.  Then he runs it through our grinder once but we’re not finished at this point.  We add 10 pounds of ground beef burger to the venison and I make sure it is all mix well and it’s run through the grinder one more time.  We add beef burger to the venison because it is a really dry meat without much marbling.  Without the marbling the meat will be dry and even touch as burger.

I did an inventory of what we have so far this morning and there’s 52 packs of burger patties, 56 of tenderloin and only 12 – 1 pound rolls of burger.  We’ll need at least three more deer to complete the pound packages.  I know this sounds like a lot for two people but the kids don’t have freezers and provide this meat for four households which includes son, daughter and granddaughter.  I can’t imagine what it would cost to buy all of this in our local grocery!!!

When I make the patties I place a sheet of wrap between each burger and then place them in Food Saver (I love this little machine) bags, vacuum pack and seal.  I date the bags and freeze and our meat so far has been as good in two years as it is fresh packaged. 

This little device makes perfect 1/4 pound patties every time!!
We have two sizes of these bags that we fill with burger, one holds a pound and a larger one holds a pound and half.
This machine tenderizes the tenderloin steaks. Hubby drops a chunk of meat in the top and catches it in the bottom and runs it again. YUMMY tender! We use it for turkey, venison, beef, any meat.
This machine is the grinder which has an attachment on the front (not shown) that does all the work!!

It looks like the next two weeks are going to keep us busy which isn’t a big problem since we’re staying close to home anyway!  We’ve done this most all of our married life and now it’s so routine we don’t even have to think about!!

3 thoughts on “Deer Season Means Work

  1. tonytomeo

    It must be nice. The deer here are so small that they are mostly ignored. My neighbor used to get some if they were damaging my fruit trees, but they became mostly sausage and stew meat. I really dislike deer in the garden, but would prefer to chase them off than to process them into a small volume of venison. Fortunately, the neighbors did all the work.
    You know what is missing now are the turkeys. They always disappear prior to Thanksgiving, and then return the day afterward.

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  2. Jane Fritz

    Hunting with a bow and arrow. I stand in awe. I hope sometime you will post a ucture of yourself shooting an arrow. That’s an amazing talent. Your description of how you dress your venison takes me way back. We had to learn the hard way about home-butchered meat that wasn’t as tender or fatty as it needed to be. The “learning year” resulted in our cats feasting on the hamburger we froze for the winter. It didn’t even taste good in spaghetti sauce! The cats liked it just fine!! 😂

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