Preparing for New Babes On the Farm

Little Red Chick House

In about two – three weeks I need to have this little charmer cleaned out, sterilized and a couple small modifications made to house the spring chicks that I get every spring. Usually in April or May I go to our local chick stores and pick up 15 – 20 little chicks. They are raised to pick up the slack when my older hens take a break next winter from laying. It normally takes 6-8 months for the chicks to mature enough to start laying those beautiful fresh eggs. If you have ever eaten a store bought egg and compared to a fresh right off the farm egg you’ll understand why my egg customers check in and buy eggs year round.

These white hens are a few of my 2019 chicks. They lay large beautiful brown eggs.
I bought six each of Speckled Sussex, Columbian Wyandotte and Buff Orpingtons.

I start them out in a large tote that is cleaned daily. Their water and food containers are filled twice a day because they eat constantly. I house this tote on our enclosed back porch and they’re kept warm by an overhead heat lamp. They remain in the tote until they double their size and then they’re moved to the little Red Chicken Barn that has been heated a couple days prior to their arrival.

This is cleaned daily as well and their feed and water containers are sterilized daily. Can you see the difference in their size?

This is their small surroundings for at least another month and warm weather arrives. At this point I open the upper area door and allow them to explore the lower level of their domain.

Quite a change in their size in six weeks! The bottom section of the chick barn is on dirt and green grass and weeds are eaten pretty quickly.

About 3-4 weeks later I let them out of the barn to browse and chat with the older chickens. By late June, early July, depending on their size, I will introduce them to the main chicken house and living large with the old girls!! πŸ™‚

They have plenty of farmland to graze with all the other animals.

3 thoughts on “Preparing for New Babes On the Farm

  1. Jane Fritz

    Takes me back. We used to get 30 baby chicks every spring when we lived on our farm. Of course, that was a long one ago, but you don’t forget. Spring and babies go together on a farm. And both our boys were born in May when we lived in our farm, which is definitely spring up here!

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