Starting African Violets

Frilly and elegant African Violets are gorgeous and are the only plant that intimidates me on a large-scale.

Their beautiful bloom and the velvety leaves are the two reasons that I continue to try to grow them.  My Aunt Kathleen had such a green thumb when it came to growing these beauties.  She had so many of them in every color under the sun!  Last fall I got some leaves from a friend and tried once again to get them to grow.  I got really frustrated and took these steps.

Start with a stem like this.
Using a pair of scissors, snip most of the stem off.
Leave about a 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch piece of stem on the leaf.
Then cut the top of the leaf off leaving about an inch of bottom on that little stem you just cut.

I know this works because I finally got six plants started and more seem to be coming on.  Proceed!

All of the instructions I have said to use a special African Violet potting soil but I just used some leftover Miracle Gro potting mix and it did fine.  Take a lead pencil and make a small hole in the soil for the stem you’ve cut.
I used a rooting hormone called “Take Root” that I stuck the stem of the cutting in a little water and then into the white powdered rooting hormone. It works, I promise!
Next, stick the stem of the cutting into that hole and press the soil tightly around it. NOW WAIT!

It took about two months before I really started seeing results.  Truthfully,  I didn’t figure it would work so I took several cuttings and put them in a tin foil pan that I filled with the Miracle Gro just as directed above.  I had about 10 – 15 cuttings in that 10″ by 12″ tin foil casserole pan that I bought at the grocery store.

I started seeing results but still wasn’t sure they would make it through the winter. I put the pan in a north facing window of my upstairs foyer which stays around 50 – 65 degrees in the winter. It got lots of light and I only watered them when the soil looked dry, careful not to get the leaves wet. Water will make ugly spots on the leaves so water from the dirt, not over the leaves.

In March those plants took off and I had a pan full of 5″- 7″ plants and little ones coming up under the big ones.

And I had my first bloom!!!

It was time to come out of the foil pan and go into individual pots.  Sunday afternoon I went to work separating (gently) from the pan and re-potting in nice little pots I got at Dollar Tree for $1 each.

I placed them in an east facing window along with the pan that small plants are still growing in. They all got a good drink of water and they’ll be fertilized in about a month.

Now, I wait and see how they all do and when I have pots full of bloom, I’ll show them off in another post.

Author: countrygirllifeonthefarm

I am a wife, mother, and grandmother that lives on a farm in Craig County, Virginia and I am retired. I love to cook, read, quilt, craft, garden, hunt and take long walks in the woods. I have one gorgeous teen granddaughter, a wonderful little grandson and two beautiful and caring children, boy & girl. I've been married to my farmer husband for 46 years and he's the "love of my life"!! I love doing things the "old" way such as canning, making maple syrup & cider, handcrafts and baking. I've taught myself to crochet, embroider, and quilt with help from my paternal grandmother. I could read until the cows come home. We live off the products we raise and hunt for the most part. We run 75 head of cattle on our farm, 30 chickens, three rabbits and one dog. I help my husband with the cattle, feeding the livestock, hauling in firewood, fence repair, and general maintenance on the farm. I was a stay-at-home mom to my children and then went to work when they finished high school. I was a cook at a School for At-Risk Teens and part-time substitute teacher. Then I started work at our local Farm Bureau and stayed there for 17 years. I worked at Virginia Tech for almost five years and decided to take early retirement in July of 2015. NOW, I'm a full-time farmwife and loving every minute of it! I love to read fiction and the Bible. I'm currently hooked on quilting novels and Annie's Attic mysteries. I started this blog in 2011 and have met so many interesting bloggers and have kept up with my friends through my blog. I love to hunt with my bow and rifle and with a camera. We hunt to fill the freezer and cellar but would never kill anything for the fun of it. I have friends and family all over the United States. Some of my ancestry last names are Bradley, Dickson, Hylton, and Rose. I've lost both of my parents to brain cancer and miss them very much. I have one sister and four living brothers. I was raised in Paint Bank VA and moved to New Castle VA when I married. I went to school in Waiteville, WV, Gap Mills, WV and New Castle Va with a short semester of college at Virginia Western Community College in Roanoke VA.

6 thoughts on “Starting African Violets”

  1. Someone else just wrote about growing succulents from leaves. I explained that I prefer good old fashioned cuttings the were not only easier, but grew more mature plants. To me, leaf cuttings are for plants that there is limited stock for, particularly if many copies are needed quick. However, African violets do not provide stems for cuttings. I suppose that the good news is that they are so easy to grow from leaves.

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      1. I grow most things in my garden, but all my roses were purchased as grafted bare root plants. I never grew one from cutting. However, it is probably just as simple as growing anything else from cutting. It should be done while they are dormant. Rooting hormone should be helpful.

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