Moonflowers

I have a new plant this year that is absolutely gorgeous!  They’re called Moonflower’s because their huge blossoms open during the night.

Moonflower plants like full to partial sun during the daylight hours. You will like the fact that Moonflower thrive in poor, dry soils. That makes them useful in areas where many other popular plants just won’t grow. It also makes them easy to grow with little care or attention. Just plant them, and away they grow!

We woke this morning to this beautiful sight at our gazebo at the pond.

We begin our mornings sitting on the front porch and having breakfast and what a treat to have fresh flowers to brighten our day!

I want to plant hostas all around the gazebo and have the moonflowers as the focal point.

The blooms fade as the heat of the day increases and I pull the spent blooms.

This plant bears large trumpet-shape flowers that unfurl in the evening or on overcast days. I’m anxious to see if any blooms open during the eclipse tomorrow.

This morning I found several buds that will open tonight.

This is a seed pod that grows on the plant. Once they dry and open I’ll collect the seeds to start next spring. Some articles I’ve read on the internet says to sow them in the fall but you can also sow them in the spring. I got this plant from a nursery after Mother’s Day.

Moonflower plants like full to partial sun during the daylight hours. You will like the fact that Moonflower thrive in poor, dry soils. That makes them useful in areas where many other popular plants just won’t grow. It also makes them easy to grow with little care or attention. Just plant them, and away they grow!

4 thoughts on “Moonflowers

  1. So pretty! They look like petunias 🙂 My dad always grew Peter’s Pennies (or money plant) and my mom dried them and saved the seeds.

    Like

    • They do look like petunias but the bloom is about 7-10 inches long and opens to a bloom about six inches across. I have money plant too! I save the seeds for friends and let them reseed the area where I have them. I do the same things with the coneflower and several other flowers. Might call it “re-purposing”! 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.