Cleaning the wood cookstove

Kitchen Cook/woodstove

Kitchen Cook/woodstove

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With the heat and humidity changes the cast iron rusts during the summer.  The following picture is how the stove looked when we moved in about 10 or 12 years ago.

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With some elbow grease, sandpaper and a wire brush it doesn’t take long to make it look like new.  We rarely use the oven in the winter when we cook but we do use the top of the stove a lot and we use it for heat.

The kitchen cook/woodstove in the fall of 2014.

The kitchen cook/woodstove in the fall of 2015.

Late fall I do a thorough top cleaning of the stove to make it look nicer and I use this product for polishing both of our woodstoves.  It doesn’t smell or put off any fumes when the stoves are first heated each fall/winter season.

Williams Stove polish goes a long way.  It's odorless and smokeless when the stove is heated.  Great product!!

Williams Stove polish goes a long way. It’s odorless and smokeless when the stove is heated. Great product!!

This is a seasonal product that I find at our local hardware store and not expensive.  I will warn you to use an old pair of rubber gloves when applying and when it's covered good, buff it until it shines.

This is a seasonal product that I find at our local hardware store and not expensive. I will warn you to use an old pair of rubber gloves when applying and when it’s covered good, buff it until it shines.

There are pipes in the back of the stove that run through the wall to the bathroom and circulates the water through the hot water tank.

The blue tank beside the chimney is our water holding tank and the water circulates through the pipes of the woodstove in the kitchen.

The blue tank beside the chimney is our water holding tank and the water circulates through the pipes of the woodstove in the kitchen.

This tank also serves as our heat source for the bathroom in the winter.  It’s nice and toasty when you get out of the shower.

Back to the stove!  I don’t clean the oven as it’s just too far gone to do a good job and I don’t think I would ever bake in it.  We do keep the heat box cleaned out good. Normally when I’m cleaning the stove hubby is cleaning the chimney before our fire season begins.  VERY IMPORTANT to clean that chimney every year.  We also clean it during the heating season because there’s nothing more frightening than a flue fire.    The stove is now being used on a regular basis until summer 2016 arrives!

Wood cookstove all cleaned up and ready to warm the kitchen and bathroom and more importantly to cook on!!

Wood cookstove all cleaned up and ready to warm the kitchen and bathroom and more importantly to cook on!!

10 responses to “Cleaning the wood cookstove

  1. I wish I had one. It’s something I’ve wanted for all my married life. Here in our part of the high mountain desert they are extent!

    Linda

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  2. Thanks so much for your reply. I did buy a carbon monoxide detector and it hasn’t gone off all the times we’ve used the heater so your response helps a ton and makes me feel much better!!!! I just was showing the man of the house your cookstove and he said the same thing about your cookstove. What a cool piece of history to have.

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  3. I have been considering buying an older wood cookstove to put on our back patio for summer cooking. I love yours!

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  4. We’ve had ours for about seven or eight years and no problems until this fan situation and think we have it corrected now. I think you’ll be fine. I got a $10.00 carbon monoxide detector for all the rooms the heater is in and change the batteries each time the time changes. We’ve not had any of them go off and I think you’ll like what you have. Just takes some time getting use to them. The biggest problem I have with the other two is getting too close with the vacumn cleaner and the air from it blows out the flame if the heat is not on. We have to use a can of air to clean them in the fall too or the flame may go out from too much dust buildup. Remember though I’m in a house that’s about two centuries old!! Dust is part of my decor now!! 😉

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  5. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that stove!! I noticed the heater in the first picture. Is that a propane heater or just electric? I’m asking as we bought a propane heater that looks just like that for our cabin and I’ve looking for advice on them as I’ve never used propane heat before.

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    • That is a propane heater which is our primary heat for the that end of the house (kitchen, family room, pantry and bathroom). We’ve had a couple issues with it last year and this year with the fan not coming on to spread the heat out but think Eddie fixed it. Let me know what issues you have and I’ll find out from Eddie what to do. We are on a propane plan with a company in Giles County that delivers our propane and right now we’re paying $1.99 per gallon and we’re having between 75 and 90 gallons put in the tank to keep it full each month since the weather has gotten cold. BUT, we have a wall unit in the family room and a larger wall unit in the guest room upstairs but we keep the thermostat turned to 60* up there since we don’t stay up there much.

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      • Ours is new and it looks just like that one. It seems to burn great and warms our little 12×12 cabin up quickly and keeps it very warm. It does have the fan but we don’t have electricity in the cabin. It has a thermostat and cycles on and off as needed. I was worried about Carbon Monoxide or if it was safe to run all night in such a small area as I’ve never used propane before except for a grill. The hardware store we bought it at had no idea and said it was for a garage then we talked to someone at Home Depot and they said it’s fine but keep a window open slightly at all times (we do have a vent in the roof that is open). They are all pretty clueless it seems!! We bought a 100 gallon tank as we won’t be using the cabin that often in the winter but would like the option to have guests etc. when they visit stay in there.

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